Much Ado About Mensa


July Mensaversaries

Wednesday 1st July 2020
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July Birthdays

Wednesday 1st July 2020
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Puzzlement #102

Sunday 28th June 2020

There were 29 responses to Puzzlement #101, all but one had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: 410. Robert McAtee was second and Harvey Gillis was third.

On to the puzzle:

IF:
2 + 4 = 6
6 + 16 = 24
24 + 36 = 62
62 + 56 = ?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #101

Sunday 21st June 2020

There were 17 responses to Puzzlement #100, all had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: Use the 3-minute and 5-minute timers. Start them going at the same time. When the 3-minute timer runs out, start the egg boiling. When the 5-minute timer runs out, the egg is done. “potoftea” was second and Charles Falkenmayer was third.

On to the puzzle:

IF:
4 + 2 = 26
8 + 1 = 79
6 + 5 = 111
7 + 3 = ?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #100

Sunday 14th June 2020

There were two responses to Puzzlement #99. The first one was from Edward Browne, but it did not have the answer that the author had in mind. It did, however, meet the reason why criteria expressed in his answer: Each column has one number divisible by 5. The correct response was submitted by Peter Bergonzi: They are all times on a clock, and each column has an “impossible time.” [either the last two digits were >59 or first digit was zero]

On to the puzzle:

You want to boil a two-minute egg. If you only have a three-minute timer (hourglass), a four-minute timer and a five-minute timer, how can you boil the egg for only two minutes?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Monday 8th June 2020
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Puzzlement #99

Sunday 7th June 2020

There were 8 responses to Puzzlement #98, all but one had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Lisa Gragg was: 2 minutes. Gerard Smorowski was second and Steve Perlmutter was third.

On to the puzzle, submitted by Diana McClure:

Which one number in each of the columns A-J do not belong, and why does it not belong? The answer to why it does not belong is the same for all the answers.

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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June Mensaversaries

Monday 1st June 2020
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June Birthdays

Monday 1st June 2020
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Puzzlement #98

Sunday 31st May 2020

There were 36 (!) responses to Puzzlement #97, all had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: 17*2 -1 = 33. Bill Camp was second and RICHARD MORRIS was third.

On to the puzzle:

A 300 ft. train is traveling 300 ft. per minute must travel through a 300 ft. long tunnel.  How long will it take the train to travel through the tunnel?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #97

Sunday 24th May 2020

There were 6 responses to Puzzlement #96, all had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Steven Sutlief was: The weights are 1, 3, 9, and 27 kg. Diana McClure was second and Bob Hanshaw was third.

On to the puzzle:

2, 3, 5, 9, 17, ?  What is the next number in the sequence?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #96

Sunday 17th May 2020

There were only two responses to Puzzlement #95, both had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: E N T. (completing the list of the first letter of the names of the numbers from one to ten) Steven Sutlief was second.

On to the puzzle:

A man had a bar of lead that weighed 40 kilograms. and he divided it into four pieces in such a way as to allow him to weigh any number of kilograms from one to forty on a balance scale. What are the weights of the four pieces?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #95

Sunday 10th May 2020

There were 11 responses to Puzzlement #94, 10 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: 

(5 x 5 x 5) - (5 x 5) = 125 - 25
(5 + 5 + 5 + 5) x 5 = 20 x 5
(5 x 5) x (5 - (5/5)) = 25 x 4

Steven Sutlief was second and Frank Pabian was third.

On to the puzzle:

What are the next 3 letters in this sequence?  O T T F F S S _ _ _

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #94

Sunday 3rd May 2020

There were 7 responses to Puzzlement #93, all had a correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: 

Divide into 2 groups of 6. Balance. Whichever group is lighter, go on to next step with that. Put the others aside.
Divide into 2 groups of 3. Balance. Whichever group is lighter, go on to next step with that. Put the others aside.
Put 1 marble on either side of the balance. The lighter marble is the one with the bubble. If the 2 marbles weigh the same, then the 3rd marble is the one.

[Also correct was to take three groups of 4, measure 4 and 4 => 2 and 2 => 1 and 1]

Michael Keleher was second and Steven Sutlief was third. 

On to the puzzle:

Express 100 three ways with five 5s.

You can use parentheses and these signs + ,- , x , / .

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

Apologies for last week’s Digest delivery. Those responsible have been sacked. - Ed

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May Mensaversaries

Friday 1st May 2020
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May Birthdays

Friday 1st May 2020
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Puzzlement #93

Sunday 26th April 2020

There were 6 responses to Puzzlement #92, 5 had a correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Steve Perlmutter was: 135/270 + 48/96 = 1. Andrew Poulos was second and Steven Sutlief was third.

On to the puzzle:

You have a collection of 12 black marbles. They are identical except one has an air bubble that can’t be seen. You have a balance scale that you can use up to 3 times to help determine which one has the bubble. What is your procedure to do this?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #92

Sunday 19th April 2020

There were 21 responses to Puzzlement #91, 19 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: The donkey is traveling in a circle. Bill Camp was second and Richard Morris was third.

On to the puzzle:

0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
Use the digits above once each only to compose two fractions which when added together equal 1.

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Zoom used for ExCom

Friday 17th April 2020

The April 12th ExCom was successfully conducted using the popular video conferencing app, Zoom. We will continue using it for those meetings to conduct official business until we are allowed to meet in person again. All members are welcome to join. A link to register with the host will be published in advance in the GPM Calendar and eUpdate.

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Puzzlement #91

Sunday 12th April 2020

There were 26 responses to Puzzlement #90, 20 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: 43. [42 plus enough shavings to make one more] Mat Wolach was second and Les Rees was third.

On to the puzzle:

A donkey travels a certain distance each day. Strangely enough, two of its legs travel 30 miles each day and the other two legs travel nearly 31 miles. It would seem that two of the donkey’s legs must be one mile ahead of the other two legs, but of course this can’t be true.

Since the donkey is normal, how is this situation possible?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Goodbye Ruby Tuesday

Sunday 12th April 2020

Gary and Gail are sad to announce the demise of our every Thursday dinner for our Mensa friends and guests. Our first dinner was on January 3, 2008; our last dinner together was on March 12, 2020. Ruby Tuesday has permanently closed the Tempe Marketplace restaurant.

Over the 12 years and 3 months of weekly dinners, we had as many as 28 diners, but more normally about 12. We survived two restaurant closures (from Cheeseburger Cheeseburger, to Stella’s Kitchen, to Ruby Tuesday), and it took a pandemic to ban dining in, at ALL restaurants, which put our dinner on hiatus until after the pandemic. Gary and Gail did use Ruby To Go for two weeks, until the phone was no longer in service on March 30th. We were unable to reach any of the other Phoenix area Ruby’s by phone, and the national Ruby Tuesday website Location finder no longer lists Arizona in their list of states with restaurants.

We thank all of our diners through the years; we thoroughly enjoyed your company and conversation. At some time after the pandemic, we expect restaurants to open up for dining in again. When we are ready and feel safe, healthwise, to dine out, Gary and Gail may rise like a Phoenix and re-invent our weekly Mensa dinners. 

Virtual hugs to all, ‘til we meet again.

Gary & Gail

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Puzzlement #90

Sunday 5th April 2020

There were 12 responses to Puzzlement #89, all had a correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Ron Draney was: AbstEmIOUslY. Joseph D’Aguanno was second and Dave Hoffman was third.

On to the puzzle:

An item is made from lead blanks in a lathe shop. Each blank suffices for 1 item. Lead shavings accumulated for making 6 items can be melted and made into a blank. How many items can be made from 36 blanks?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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April Mensaversaries

Wednesday 1st April 2020
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April Birthdays

Wednesday 1st April 2020
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Puzzlement #89

Sunday 29th March 2020

There were 12 responses to Puzzlement #88, 11 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Paul Cottey was: 1890 to 1918 because 1900 was not a leap year. [It doesn’t work if any of the intervening year numbers are evenly divisible by 100 but not 400. Those aren’t leap years.] Steve Perlmutter was second and Bill Camp was third.

On to the puzzle:

The word FACETIOUSLY contains the six vowels, A-E-I-O-U and Y, in their alphabetical order. Can you find another English word that does the same?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #88

Sunday 22nd March 2020

There were 10 responses to Puzzlement #87, only x had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: 

The 24 clock is striking a tone once per hour.
The 156 = 78x2 = (1+2+3…12)x2 clock strikes the o'clock number (1-12) on the hour.
The 180 ( = 156 + 24) clock strikes the o'clock number, plus one additional (different pitch?) tone on the half-hour.
The 228 ( = 156 + 24x3) clock strikes the o'clock number, plus once for the ¼, ½ and ¾ hour.

 Ann DeVlaeminck was second and Robert McAtee was third.

On to the puzzle:

Last year, Mary didn’t buy a wall calendar for 2019, because she still had one for 1991, which was identical (except for some holidays). Mary never throws anything out.

Generally, with our Gregorian calendar, one can use a calendar from 28 years ago in place of the current year. Which of the following year pairs did not follow this rule of thumb? Why not?

a. 1890 / 1918
b. 1901 / 1929
c. 1917 / 1945
d. 1935 / 1963
e. 1992 / 2020

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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COVID-19 and GPM

Saturday 21st March 2020

The pandemic has shut down our entire 📅Calendar of Events. 🙁While the calendar may not directly indicate cancellation going forward, consider them canceled until restaurants and homes can again be opened for our events.

We will, however, be holding our monthly ExCom meeting via teleconference.

🙏Stay safe!

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Puzzlement #87

Sunday 8th March 2020

There were 2 responses to Puzzlement #86, neither one had the correct answer. (You were not allowed to get help or damage the cards.) The answer was: You divide the cards into two piles with 10 and 42 cards each. Then flip all cards in the smaller pile. 

On to the puzzle:

At a clock store, a clock strikes 24 times a day, while others strike 156 times, and some strike 180 times a day. Some strike 228 times a day. All are in good order. How do they have such a big difference in the number of strikes?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #86

Sunday 1st March 2020

There were 18 responses to Puzzlement #85, 17 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: 

Say Box 1 is labeled Apples, Box 2 is labeled Oranges, Box 3 is labeled Apples and Oranges. If all are incorrect, we know 1 is either AO or O, 2 is either AO or A, 3 is either A or O.
Pick a fruit from 3.
If it’s an apple,  then Box 3 must be A, 2 must be AO, therefore 1 must be O.
If it’s an orange, then Box 3 must be O, 1 must be AO, therefore 2 must be A.

Steve S was second and Larry Bond was third.

On to the puzzle:

You are blind-folded and handed a deck of 52 cards and told that exactly 10 of these cards are facing up. You are asked to divide those cards into two piles, each with the same number of cards facing up.

You can’t peek, get help, or damage the cards, but may use any strategy that occurs to you to do so.

How can you do it?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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March Mensaversaries

Sunday 1st March 2020
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March Birthdays

Sunday 1st March 2020
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Puzzlement #85

Sunday 23rd February 2020

There were 12 responses to Puzzlement #84, only 5 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Evan Bauer was: 1:05:27. Frank Pabian was second and Steve S was third.

On to the puzzle:

There are three boxes. One is labeled “APPLES” another is labeled “ORANGES”. The last one is labeled “APPLES AND ORANGES”. You know that each is labeled incorrectly. You may ask me to pick one fruit from one box which you choose.

How can you label the boxes correctly?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #84

Sunday 16th February 2020

There were 27 responses to Puzzlement #83, all had a correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Ed Goheen was: They were born nearby but on opposite sides of the international date line. Dave Hoffman was second and Steve S was third.

Grumpy Puzzlement Maven’s Note: The date line is the simple answer, but it can actually occur whenever the date clicks over to the next day in one location, let’s say New York and the other person is in a different time zone to the West, say Phoenix. Only a few puzzlement solvers pointed that out, but it shows why everyone got it right.

On to the puzzle:

At midday the hour and minute hands of a clock sit on top of each other perfectly. In a little over one hour they will again be on top of each other.

What is the exact time (h:m:ss) that happens?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Tuesday on Thursdays?

Sunday 16th February 2020

Ruby Tuesday, that is. On 2/13/2020, our Ruby Tuesday GPM Dinner had a record turnout of 19 members and guests. Gary and Gail have hosted a Thursday Dinner for GPM, now in our 13th year (and on our 3rd restaurant at Tempe Marketplace). We were celebrating Gail’s (Feb. 12) birthday with our Mensa family, and we outgrew our normal table for 12 after squeezing in a 13th, and Ruby Tuesday set up a round table to accommodate the last 3 couples to arrive. A great time was had by all. Gary and Gail are pictured at the left with 16 others. (No names for privacy to those who requested it.) The 19th reveler, not in photo, is a gifted photographer, Connie McCabe, who gave permission to name her. She took this picture, at Gail’s spur of the moment request, with her phone camera. [This is a regular weekly event on the GPM calendar]

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ONLY YOU can fill this hole in my heart... be my Valentine!

Friday 14th February 2020
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RVC 9 Article: “Love and the Liquor Store”

Friday 14th February 2020

From Alton Hitchcock Jr., Region 9 Vice Chapman

The thing I appreciate most about Mensa is the way members support each other. It’s a place where it’s ok to be you and generally speaking everyone is ok with you doing you, quirks and all. That’s unusual in the world today. I’m lucky enough to have learned this lesson from my father at a young age. We’re lucky that we have a community that fosters it at every turn for every member.

In 1980 just down the street from my house was the coolest shopping center in the world. It held Perry’s Pizza, Alpha Beta and the liquor store owned by the first Asian Americans I ever knew. Not many 8 year olds can say this, but that liquor store was my favorite place in the world. It was the “outback” to me. It was the epitome of wonder. It was a quixotic destination for a child, because it held the Holy Grail… PAC MAN.

I recall my father taking me to this liquor store when PAC MAN was first released. It was a special trip just to play a video game. I remember standing in the corner (just a quick left as you entered the store). It was always a little musty in there, wood paneling on the walls, candy displayed as brightly as the cigarettes. I could barely see over the console and my dad stood behind me, watching patiently. I don’t remember how I played, if I passed a level, ate a power pellet or swallowed a ghost, but I remember how excited I was. I remember the feeling of being transported to a different place, being gifted powers and purpose. I fell in love with video games that day.

I didn’t know I was a “gamer” then. I was just a kid who liked games. Come to find out… that’s the definition. Gamers have gotten a bad wrap in the last 30 years. The word “gamer” invokes images of an overweight youth sitting on a couch, barking orders into a headset with soda cans and empty Dorito bags strewn about. There are healthy kids with glowing skin standing at the front door asking his mother if he can come out to play. Sadly… NO. He’s busy wasting his life on a video game.

I have owned a video game system since pong was released at Sears and Roebuck in 1975. I own one today and I played games last night. I graduated from college. I have a great job. I have friends and family that I love, and I’m married to a beautiful, funny, smart girl (granted she does hate my video games). I turned out ok. I don’t love video games. I love what they offer me: brief moments to be a champion, to conquer evil, to save the day. I lose but it’s not the end. I get another chance. In truth you can’t lose; you can only start over. Despite the odds I overcome. Even better sometimes I win.

Let me tell you this much… I hope I can take my son to the liquor store. I hope he falls in love with that place. I know where I’ll be. I’ll be standing behind him, patiently watching. I didn’t see my father’s face that day. I have no memory of it. But I am sure he was smiling; watching me discover something I love.

Thanks for taking me to the liquor store dad.

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Puzzlement #83

Sunday 9th February 2020

There were 31 responses to Puzzlement #82, ALL had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: Grandpa -> Dad -> Son. Peter Bergonzi was second and Paul Cottey was third.

On to the puzzle:

Two people are born at the same moment, but they don’t have the same birthdays. How could this be?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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February Mensaversaries

Monday 3rd February 2020
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February Birthdays

Monday 3rd February 2020
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Puzzlement #82

Sunday 2nd February 2020

There were 14 responses to Puzzlement #81, 6 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Stephen Stuart was: -3x6+2+7 = -9. Peter Bergonzi was second and Ann DeVlaeminck was third. [Parentheses were not one of the allowed symbols in the question statement.]

On to the puzzle:

There are two fathers and two sons. They walk into a candy store and each buys a candy bar for 50 cents. The total for all of the candy bars was $1.50. How is that possible?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #81

Sunday 26th January 2020

There were 21 responses to Puzzlement #80, ALL had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Michele Fleury was: 

Sam grass pear
Anna stream orange
Harriet rock apple
Mike tree banana

Lilly Mullenix was second and David Mills was third.

On to the puzzle:

What are the missing symbols, + - x / to make this correct?

 3  6  2  7 = -9

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Photo from Richard Morris

Sunday 19th January 2020
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Puzzlement #80

Sunday 19th January 2020

There were 12 responses to Puzzlement #79, 9 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Paul Cottey was: Near the South Pole. Ron Draney was second and Steven Sutlief was third. (There are many possible answers that can meet the requirement. Starting point may be from 1 + 1/(2pi) km away from the pole in any direction, but it can be closer such that the circle is completed more than one time to travel 1 km.)

On to the puzzle:

Ms Johnson’s 4th grade class took a field trip to the local zoo. The day was sunny and warm - a perfect day to spend at the zoo. The kids had a great time and the monkeys were voted the class favorite animal. The zoo had four monkeys - two males and two females. It was lunchtime for the monkeys and as the kids watched, each one ate a different fruit in their favorite resting place. Can you determine the name of each monkey, what kind of fruit each monkey ate, and where their favorite resting place was?

  1. Sam, who doesn’t like bananas, likes sitting on the grass.
  2. The monkey who sat on the rock ate the apple. The monkey who ate the pear didn’t sit on the tree branch.
  3. Anna sat by the stream but she didn’t eat the pear.
  4. Harriet didn’t sit on the tree branch. Mike doesn’t like oranges.

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Volunteers Needed

Friday 17th January 2020

The annual high school Academic Decathlon is coming up soon. The 2020 Regional Competitions will be held on Friday, January 31 and Saturday, February 1, 2020. The Region I competition will be at Snowflake High School, Region II at Thunderbird High School, Region III at Cibola High School, and Region IV at Red Mountain High School.

Essays are submitted and judged online before the event. Student interviews and speeches are judged live during the event. Volunteers are also needed to timekeepers and test proctors. The event starts Friday afternoon and continues through Saturday evening.

More details are available at http://www.azacadec.org/volunteers/ Howie Asaki, a GPM member has been doing this for years can give you an idea of what to expect by emailing him at civilwar803@gmail.com.

For further questions about volunteering, you can also contact Anne Edelstein at 602-263-5335.

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Puzzlement #79

Sunday 12th January 2020

Going back to Puzzlement #77: There were no correct answers submitted until the following week when the clue that the answer wasn’t a number was posted. After that, Andrew Pulos was first to submit the correct answer, R. Peter Bergonzi was second and Evan Bauer was third.

There were 25 responses to Puzzlement #78, 22 had the correct answer, but the first one, submitted by Larry Bond was: Switch horses. Ed Goheen was second and Ann DeVlaeminck was third.

On to the puzzle:

Bob Fogg is standing somewhere on the planet Earth. He walks one kilometer south, then one km east and finally one km north. He’s back where he started.

Where is he?

Your probable first answer is no longer valid. The North Pole is now covered in constantly shifting sea ice. The surface is no longer solid throughout the year, so Bob can’t actually be standing there or walking away.

But there’s at least one other answer. Where is he?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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Puzzlement #78

Sunday 5th January 2020

There were 6 responses to Puzzlement #77, but NOBODY had the correct answer so I am giving y'all another try with the following clue: The answer is not a number. Try again with your submission to today’s Puzzlement.

On to the puzzle:

The 1870s robber baron Dewey Cheatham has decided to pit his two sons against each other to determine which one will inherit his vast holdings of Union Pacific stock. He tells them to saddle up and race their horses to Tucson, but the one whose horse gets there LAST will win.

Obsessed with the inheritance, the Cheatham boys amble across the wasteland, trying to outlast each other. After three days in the desert sun, they meet Gabby, a wise old prospector, and ask him what to do. Gabby gives them a long-winded opinion.

At the end, the boys look at each other, scramble to the horses, and gallop off hell-for-leather toward Tucson.

What did Gabby tell them?

To submit an answer, click HERE or send it to editor@phoenixmensa.org

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January Mensaversaries

Wednesday 1st January 2020
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January Birthdays

Wednesday 1st January 2020
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RVC 9 Article: “Watching Time”

Wednesday 1st January 2020

From Alton Hitchcock Jr., Region 9 Vice Chairman

I used to be obsessed with watches. I can’t remember my first watch but I have literally owned hundreds of them. Calculator watches in the early 80’s followed by Swatches in high school and then on to more sophisticated timepieces. I have owned pocket watches on chains, keychain clocks and rubber wristband watches to wear while surfing. I never owned a sundial, but I have had use of the sun and a stick for a long time.

I think I was obsessed with the “keeping” of time. Does that watch keep good time? It’s an odd question. You can’t keep time, and whether or not the time you can’t keep is good is highly subjective.  Does that watch count time in segments you find pleasing? Are you enjoying time? Maybe these are more appropriate.

I stopped wearing a watch after college. I found I couldn’t stop looking at it after a while. I had developed a habit of checking the time. Checking time? You can check the accuracy of the timepiece you carry but that timepiece is independently calibrated against some measure that we decided counts time in units we decided are useful for dividing days. Days are just larger units of time. They don’t fit well on wristwatches. We stick to just half a day on a watch. Then we count it twice for a full day. Days we count 28, 30 or 31 in groups and call them months. Months we count in bundles of 12 and call those years. Years all have the same number of days even though months are not constant but hours in days are. We do shift those hours in some months to account for something called daylight savings, Event though no real savings occur.

It’s all very confusing, time. Where has the time gone? I don’t know if it goes anywhere. It doesn’t need to since it is everywhere at every moment. Time is not on a schedule.  In truth time is really just our experience of now, the nows that have gone and the nows we are waiting for. I don’t wear a watch anymore. I don’t wear one because I want to be here now. Nows are easy to count. There’s just one. You don’t need an apparatus to count that. It doesn’t even need to be counted.

Another year has passed Mensan. How are your nows? How have your nows been and how will you next nows progress? I hope this new year brings you better nows. Of course it won’t. You can’t bring a now anywhere. Luckily they’re always here. What you can control is how you see them.

If you find yourself staring at your watch today, ask yourself this question. Why is it called a watch? I think perhaps for the most obvious reason.

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Wednesday 1st January 2020
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